Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on the Role of Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in the Treatment of Adults with Metastatic Brain Tumors

Clark C. Chen, Robert C. Rennert, Jeffrey J. Olson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

TARGET POPULATIONS: Adults with solid brain metastases who have not experienced a seizure. QUESTION 1: Do prophylactic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) decrease the risk of seizures in nonsurgical patients with brain metastases who are otherwise seizure-free? RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: Prophylactic AEDs are not recommended for patients with brain metastases who did not undergo surgical resection and are otherwise seizure-free. QUESTION 2: Do prophylactic AEDs decrease the risk of seizures in patients with brain metastases and no prior history of seizures in the postoperative setting? RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: Routine postcraniotomy AED use for seizure-free patients with brain metastases is not recommended. The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-treatmentadults-metastatic-brain-tumors/chapter-8.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E195-E197
JournalClinical Neurosurgery
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
These evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were funded exclusively by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the Tumor Section of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, which received no funding from outside commercial sources to support the development of this document.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

Keywords

  • Antiepileptic drugs
  • Cerebral metastases
  • Craniotomy
  • Seizure

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