Congenital scoliosis with posterior spinal arthrodesis T2-L3 at age 3 years with 41-year follow-up: A case report

Robert B. Winter, John E. Lonstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Design. A case report. Objectives. To document the long-term effects of early fusion for progressive congenital scoliosis. Summary of Background Data. There is concern about fusion at an early age causing torso shortening and possible crankshaft phenomenon. Methods. A review of medical and radiologic records. Results. A 3-year old girl with progressive congenital scoliosis has posterior spinal arthrodesis in 1955. A pseudarthrosis was repaired at age 4, and at age 8 she had an osteotomy of the fusion mass because of bending of the fusion mass. In a follow-up 41 years after fusion, she has no back pain and no history of pulmonary problems. Despite the long fusion at a young age, her torsoto-leg ratio was remarkably good. The thoracic lordosis had improved to a normal thoracic kyphosis. Conclusion. Early arthrodesis was life saving and caused no long- term problem. Because significant spinal growth has occurred by age 3, no adverse effects on torso-leg ratio with early long arthrodesis, and in addition the crankshaft phenomenon is rare in congenital scoliosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-197
Number of pages4
JournalSpine
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 1999

Keywords

  • Congenital lung agenesis
  • Congenital scoliosis
  • Long-term follow- up
  • Posterior arthrodesis

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