Confronting the ubiquity of electronic communication and social media: Ethical and legal considerations for psychoeducational practice

Joseph A. Demers, Amanda L Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most U.S. children and adults use computers and the Internet on a daily basis. The pervasiveness of electronic communication in a variety of contexts, including home and school, raises ethical and legal concerns for school psychologists and those in related fields of practice, because of the risks to privacy and confidentiality, boundaries, competence, and students' well-being. We detail the legal and ethical dilemmas school psychologists may face in electronic data storage and transmission, use of social networking, and efforts to address cyber bullying. We review relevant legal and ethical guidelines and provide recommendations for training and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-532
Number of pages16
JournalPsychology in the Schools
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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