Conflict processes and transitions in parent and peer relationships: Implications for autonomy and regulation

W. Andrew Collins, Brett Laursen, Nicole Mortensen, Coral Luebker, Margaret Ferreira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

102 Scopus citations

Abstract

Relational components of three attributes often regarded as individual variables (conflict, autonomy, and self-regulation) were examined in two studies. In Study 1, mothers and their 10-through 12-, 13-through 15-, or 16-through 17-year-old offspring reported expected times of transition to 47 adultlike behaviors (behavioral autonomy) and rated the importance of delaying each transition. Discrepancies from mothers' expectancies were found to be greatest for 13-through 15-year-olds. In Study 2, characteristics and correlates of conflict across different types of relationships were assessed. Sixth-grade and eighth-grade Hispanic American adolescents reported significant differentiation among relationships with mothers, fathers, and friends in frequency of conflict, conflict resolution strategies and sequelae, and correlates of adolescents' psychosocial competence. Variations suggest that multiple relationships may be involved in the development of autonomy and self-regulation during childhood and adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-198
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Adolescent Research
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1997

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