Confiding About Problems in Marriage and Long-Term Committed Relationships: A National Study

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Abstract

This study examined confiding patterns in a national sample of 1000 U.S. adults aged 25-70 to inform the development of an educational program for confidants, called Marital First Responders. Results showed that 73% of U.S. adults have been a confidant to someone with a problem in a marriage or long-term committed relationship. The most common confiding relationship was between friends, followed by siblings. Confidants reported a wide range of problems brought to them, ranging from everyday complaints to serious issues such as infidelity and divorce. Confiders identified the most and least helpful responses. Findings suggest that naturally occurring confiding relationships have considerable potential to be the first level of help for troubled couple relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-450
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of marital and family therapy
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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