Condoning discrimination: The effects of dominance and authoritarianism are moderated by different ways of reasoning about antigay discriminatory acts

V. Paul Poteat, Stacey S. Horn, Patrick I. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many studies have focused on mediated paths by which social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) predict prejudice; fewer have identified factors that moderate their effects. We applied social cognitive domain theory to test whether different ways of reasoning about antigay discriminatory acts moderated the association between SDO, RWA, and condoning antigay discrimination. Moral reasoning (e.g., emphasizing fairness, equality) and personal reasoning (e.g., emphasizing individual interests, qualifications) attenuated the association between SDO, RWA, and condoning discriminatory resource denial in general and religious-specific contexts. Conventional reasoning (e.g., emphasizing group norms, rules) magnified the association between SDO, RWA, and condoning resource denial, but only in a religious-specific context. Findings highlight the need to examine moderators of SDO and RWA effects in effort to disrupt discrimination by those most likely to engage in it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-849
Number of pages19
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Keywords

  • homophobia
  • moral reasoning
  • prejudice
  • right-wing authoritarianism
  • social cognitive domain theory
  • social dominance orientation

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