Concordance of multiple analytical approaches demonstrates a complex relationship between DNA repair gene SNPs, smoking and bladder cancer susceptibility

Angeline S. Andrew, Heather H. Nelson, Karl T. Kelsey, Jason H. Moore, Alexis C. Meng, Daniel P. Casella, Tor D. Tosteson, Alan R. Schned, Margaret R. Karagas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study results of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cancer susceptibility are often conflicting, possibly because of the analytic challenges of testing for multiple genetic and environmental risk factors using traditional analytic tools. We investigated the relationship between DNA repair gene SNPs, smoking, and bladder cancer susceptibility in 355 cases and 559 controls enrolled in a population-based study of bladder cancer in the US. Our multifaceted analytical approach included logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction, and hierarchical interaction graphs for the analysis of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions followed by linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis. Overall, we did not find an association between any single DNA repair gene SNP and bladder cancer risk. We did find a marginally significant elevated risk of the XPD codon 751 homozygote variant among never smokers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-6.2]. In addition, the XRCC1 194 variant allele was associated with a reduced bladder cancer risk among heavy smokers [adjusted OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9)]. The best predictors of bladder cancer included the XPD codon 751 and 312 SNPs along with smoking. Interpretation of this multifactor model revealed that the relationship between the XPD SNPs and bladder cancer is mostly non-additive while the effect of smoking is mostly additive. Since the two XPD SNPs are in significant linkage disequilibrium (D ′ = 0.52, P = 0.0001), we estimated XPD haplotypes. Individuals with variant XPD haplotypes were more susceptible to bladder cancer [e.g. adjusted OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.6] and the effect was magnified when smoking was considered. These results support the hypothesis that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes modify bladder cancer risk and emphasize the need for a multifaceted statistical approach to identify gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1030-1037
Number of pages8
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank all members of the New Hampshire Health Study team for making this project possible. This publication was funded in part by National Institute of Health grant numbers CA099500, CA82354, CA57494, from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and grants ES00002, 5 P42 ES05947, RR018787, and ES07373 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Additional support for Dr. Andrew was kindly provided through a fellowship from the American Society of Preventive Oncology and the Cancer Research Foundation of America. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH, NCI, ASPO, or CRFA.

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