Concordance of children's intake of selected food groups as reported by parents via 24-h dietary recall and ecological momentary assessment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To understand how dietary intake data collected via a brief ecological momentary assessment (EMA) measure compares to that of data collected via interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recalls, and explore differences in level of concordance between these two assessment types by individual- and meal-level characteristics. Design: Parents completed three 24-h dietary recalls and 8 d of brief EMA surveys on behalf of their child; in total, there were 185 d where dietary intake data from both EMA and 24-h recall were available. The EMA measure asked parents to indicate whether (yes/no) their child had consumed any of the nine total food items (e.g. fruit, vegetable, etc.) at eating occasions where both the child and parent were present. Setting: Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls were completed in person in the study participant's home; participants completed EMA surveys using a study provided in iPad or their personal cell phone. Participants: A diverse, population-based sample of parent-child dyads (n 150). Results: Among meals reported in both the EMA and dietary recalls, concordance of reporting of specific types of food ranged from moderate agreement for meat (kappa = 0·55); fair agreement for sweets (kappa = 0·38), beans/nuts (kappa = 0·37), dairy (kappa = 0·31), fruit (kappa = 0·31) and vegetables (kappa = 0·27); and little to no agreement for refined grains, whole grains and sweetened beverages (73 % overall agreement; kappa = 0·14). Concordance of reporting was highest for breakfast and snacks, as compared with other eating occasions. Higher concordance was observed between the two measures if the meal occurred at home. Conclusions: Data suggest that among meals reported in both the EMA and dietary recalls, concordance in reporting was reasonably good for some types of food but only fair or poor for others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-33
Number of pages12
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements: The Family Matters study is a team effort and could not have been accomplished without the dedicated staff who carried out the home visits, including: Awo Ahmed, Nimo Ahmed, Rodolfo Batres, Carlos Chavez, Mia Donley, Michelle Draxton, Carrie Hanson-Bradley, Sulekha Ibrahim, Walter Novillo, Alejandra Ochoa, Luis ‘Marty’ Ortega, Anna Schulte, Hiba Sharif, Mai See Thao, Rebecca Tran, Bai Vue and Serena Xiong. These individuals have given permission for this manuscript and other manuscripts stemming from data collected as a part of the Family Matters study to be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of the Academy for Nutrition and Dietetics. Financial support: Research is supported by grant no. R01 HL126171-04 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (PI: J.M.B.) and the first authors (K.A.L.) time is supported by grant no. K23-HD090324-01A1 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (PI: K.A.L.). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development or the National Institutes of Health. Conflict of interest: All authors have no financial disclosures to report. Authorship: K.A.L. assisted with the development of study concept and design; assisted with interpretation of the data; wrote the initial draft of the manuscript and coordinated revisions to the manuscript. A.F. assisted with the development of study concept and design; lead data analysis and assisted with writing and thorough review of the manuscript. A.T. assisted with the development of study concept and design; lead data acquisition; assisted with interpretation of the data and assisted with writing and thorough review of the manuscript. L.H. assisted with writing and thorough review of the manuscript. R.C. assisted with the development of study concept and design and assisted with writing and conducting a thorough review of the manuscript. D.N.-S. assisted with the development of study concept and design and assisted with writing and conducting a thorough review of the manuscript. J.M.B. is the principal investigator of the study; acted as a guarantor of the integrity of entire study; lead the development of study concept and design; assisted with data acquisition and assisted with writing and thorough review of the manuscript. Ethics of human subject participation: This study was conducted according to the guidelines laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki, and all procedures involving study participants were approved by the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects/patients.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors.

Keywords

  • Concordance
  • Dietary recalls
  • Diversity
  • Ecological momentary assessment
  • Snacking

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Concordance of children's intake of selected food groups as reported by parents via 24-h dietary recall and ecological momentary assessment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this