Compressed sensing with applications in wireless networks

Markus Leinonen, Marian Codreanu, Georgios Giannakis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sparsity is an attribute present in a myriad of natural signals and systems, occurring either inherently or after a suitable projection. Such signals with lots of zeros possess minimal degrees of freedom and are thus attractive from an implementation perspective in wireless networks. While sparsity has appeared for decades in various mathematical fields, the emergence of compressed sensing (CS) - the joint sampling and compression paradigm - in 2006 gave rise to plethora of novel communication designs that can efficiently exploit sparsity. In this monograph, we review several CS frameworks where sparsity is exploited to improve the quality of signal reconstruction/detection while reducing the use of radio and energy resources by decreasing, e.g., the sampling rate, transmission rate, and number of computations. The first part focuses on several advanced CS signal reconstruction techniques along with wireless applications. The second part deals with efficient data gathering and lossy compression techniques in wireless sensor networks. Finally, the third part addresses CS-driven designs for spectrum sensing and multi-user detection for cognitive and wireless communications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-282
Number of pages282
JournalFoundations and Trends in Signal Processing
Volume13
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The work of M. Leinonen and M. Codreanu has been financially supported in part by Infotech Oulu, the Academy of Finland (grant 323698), and Academy of Finland 6Genesis Flagship (grant 318927). M. Codreanu would like to acknowledge the support of the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No. 793402 (COMPRESS NETS). G. B. Giannakis’ work was supported in part by NSF grants NSF 1508993, 1514056, 1711471, and 1901134.

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