Comprehensive strategic planning for the use and management of forest resources: The experiences of state governments in the United States

Michael A. Kilgore, Calder M. Hibbard, Paul V. Ellefson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

A 2003 survey found that 23 states are engaged in comprehensive forest resource planning activities. While the primary reason for such involvement is to establish direction for the use and management of a state's forest resources, the format and content of individual state's plans varies considerably. The study found that numerous professionals and stakeholder groups are engaged in state forest resource planning. Within a state's natural resources agency, fish and wildlife professionals are the non-forestry staff most actively engaged in forest planning activities carried out by a state's lead forestry agency. External to the state forestry agency, conservation, environmental, forest products, and landowner groups have the greatest involvement in development of comprehensive forest resource plans. Commonly cited reasons for not updating statewide comprehensive forest resource plans are the lack of financial and professional resources, shift in planning emphasis, lack of stakeholder support, plans prepared by non-forestry agencies, and changing agency information needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-49
Number of pages8
JournalForest Policy and Economics
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2006

Keywords

  • Administration
  • Collaboration
  • Forest resources
  • Government
  • Planning
  • Policy
  • Strategic planning

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