Complete unroofing of the intramural coronary artery for anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery: The role of commissural resuspension?

Can Yerebakan, Mahmut Ozturk, Lucas Mota, Lok Sinha, Heather Gordish-Dressman, Richard Jonas, Pranava Sinha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Although surgical repair of an anomalous aortic origin of the coronary artery has low operative mortality, longer-term risk of ischemia and aortic regurgitation remains concerning. We routinely perform aortic commissure resuspension after unroofing and sought to evaluate the outcomes with regard to aortic valve competence, symptoms, and signs of ischemia with this approach. Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients who received the unroofing procedure for anomalous aortic origin of the coronary artery (10 left; 16 right) between 2004 and 2016 were reviewed. In addition to complete unroofing of the intramural coronary, patients early in the cohort (n = 9) received unroofing only, and aortic commissural resuspension was performed routinely in the subsequent patients (n = 17). Outcomes between commissural resuspension versus no commissural resuspension were compared. The occurrence of mild and greater aortic regurgitation was assessed using a time-to-event analysis after varying lengths of time. Commissural resuspension was considered as the predictor, and the groups were compared using a log-rank test. Results: There was no operative mortality. One patient in the no commissural resuspension group died 10 years later of prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis (aortic valve replacement 7 years after unroofing). The follow-up duration was 6.9 years (4.9-9.1) and 3.7 years (2.1-4.3) in the no commissural resuspension and commissural resuspension groups, respectively (P =.001). Available postoperative exercise stress test data (n = 14) revealed that 50% had an endurance level at the 25th percentile or greater for age. After a median follow-up of 1.9 years (3 months to 10.6 years), no patient in the commissural resuspension group had aortic regurgitation, whereas 6 of 9 patients (67%) in the no commissural resuspension group had stable but mild or greater aortic regurgitation. Time-to-event analysis with the primary event of occurrence of mild or greater aortic regurgitation showed significantly higher freedom from the occurrence of aortic regurgitation in the commissural resuspension group (P =.035). Conclusions: Surgical repair of an anomalous aortic origin of the coronary artery can be performed with excellent early and midterm outcomes. Routine commissural resuspension of the aortic valve may lead to a lower rate of aortic valve regurgitation without increasing the risk of ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-217.e2
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume158
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery

Keywords

  • aorta
  • aortic valve
  • coronary anomaly
  • myocardial ischemia
  • surgical repair
  • unroofing

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