Compassion fatigue and burnout in nurses who work with children with chronic conditions and their families

Jennifer C. Maytum, Mary Bielski Heiman, Ann W. Garwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

154 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction With the current and ever-growing shortage of nurses in the United States, it is imperative that nurses find ways to prevent burnout and effectively manage compassion fatigue that can result from working with traumatized populations. The aim of this study is to identify the triggers and coping strategies that nurses who work with children with chronic conditions use to manage compassion fatigue and prevent burnout. Method In this descriptive qualitative pilot project, 20 experienced nurses who work with children with chronic conditions were interviewed about their experiences with compassion fatigue and burnout. Results Findings indicate that compassion fatigue is commonly and episodically experienced by nurses working with children with chronic conditions and their families. Participants reported that insight and experience helped them develop short- and long-term coping strategies to minimize and manage compassion fatigue episodes and prevent burnout. Discussion Nurses need to be able to identify signs of compassion fatigue and develop a range of coping strategies and a support system to revitalize their compassion and minimize the risk of burnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-179
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Health Care
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Preparation of this manuscript was supported in part by the Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, funded by Health Resources and Services Administration/Maternal and Child Health Bureau (grant No. 6T80 MC00010-11-01).

Copyright:
Copyright 2012 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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