Comparison of viral env proteins from acute and chronic infections with subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 identifies differences in glycosylation and CCR5 utilization and suggests a new strategy for immunogen design

Li Hua Ping, Sarah B. Joseph, Jeffrey A. Anderson, Melissa Rose Abrahams, Jesus F. Salazar-Gonzalez, Laura P. Kincer, Florette K. Treurnicht, Leslie Arney, Suany Ojeda, Ming Zhang, Jessica Keys, E. Lake Potter, Haitao Chu, Penny Moore, Maria G. Salazar, Shilpa Iyer, Cassandra Jabara, Jennifer Kirchherr, Clement Mapanje, Nobubelo NganduCathal Seoighe, Irving Hoffman, Feng Gao, Yuyang Tang, Celia Labranche, Benhur Lee, Andrew Saville, Marion Vermeulen, Susan Fiscus, Lynn Morris, Salim Abdool Karim, Barton F. Haynes, George M. Shaw, Bette T. Korber, Beatrice H. Hahn, Myron S. Cohen, David Montefiori, Carolyn Williamson, Ronald Swanstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

84 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is central to developing effective prevention strategies, including a vaccine.Wecompared phenotypic and genetic variation in HIV-1 env genes from subjects in acute/early infection and subjects with chronic infections in the context of subtypeCheterosexual transmission.Wefound that the transmitted viruses all used CCR5 and required high levels of CD4 to infect target cells, suggesting selection for replication in T cells and not macrophages after transmission. In addition, the transmitted viruses were more likely to use a maraviroc-sensitive conformation of CCR5, perhaps identifying a feature of the target T cell.Weconfirmed an earlier observation that the transmitted viruses were, on average, modestly underglycosylated relative to the viruses from chronically infected subjects. This difference was most pronounced in comparing the viruses in acutely infected men to those in chronically infected women. These features of the transmitted virus point to selective pressures during the transmission event.Wedid not observe a consistent difference either in heterologous neutralization sensitivity or in sensitivity to soluble CD4 between the two groups, suggesting similar conformations between viruses from acute and chronic infection. However, the presence or absence of glycosylation sites had differential effects on neutralization sensitivity for different antibodies.Wesuggest that the occasional absence of glycosylation sites encoded in the conserved regions of env, further reduced in transmitted viruses, could expose specific surface structures on the protein as antibody targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7218-7233
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of virology
Volume87
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Copyright:
Copyright 2013 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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