Comparison of the effectiveness and safety of transscleral cyclophotocoagulation and endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation in pediatric glaucoma

Courtney L. Kraus, Lawrence Tychsen, Gregg T. Lueder, Susan M. Culican

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Among the options for surgical management of pediatric glaucoma, destruction of the ciliary body reduces aqueous production and, consequently, intraocular pressure (IOP). Compared to more invasive filtering and shunt procedures, cyclodestruction is an attractive option for control of IOP in pediatric glaucomas. Methods: The relative reduction in IOP, duration of effect, and comparable safety and efficacy of transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCP) and endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) in pediatric patients with glaucoma was studied in this retrospective chart review. Results: A reduction in IOP of 28.6% and 33.2% with TSCP and ECP, respectively, was found. Eyes treated with ECP underwent an average of 3.24 cyclodestructive procedures; eyes treated with TSCP underwent an average of 2.29 cyclodestructive treatments. These differences were not statistically significant. A final success rate of 67.6% after TSCP and 62% after ECP failed to significantly differ between the two groups. Consequently, two-thirds of the patients were able to avoid penetrating surgery and the associated risks after one or more cyclodestructive procedures. Conclusions: TSCP and ECP are safe, effective, and comparable treatments for pediatric glaucomas. The results suggest that TSCP and ECP may be considered first-line therapy to achieve control of IOP in all forms of pediatric glaucoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-127
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

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