Comparison of Maternal and Neonatal Subspecialty Care Provision by Hospital

Mark A. Clapp, Sindhu K. Srinivas, Katy B. Kozhimannil, William A. Grobman, Anjali J. Kaimal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective The aim of the study is to determine the relationship between a hospital's provision of subspecialty neonatal and maternal care. Specifically, we sought to understand where women with high-risk maternal conditions received intrapartum care and estimate the potential transfer burden for those with maternal high-risk conditions delivering at hospitals without subspecialty maternal care. Study Design This is a descriptive study using data from 2015 State Inpatient Databases and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Characteristics were compared between hospitals based on the concordance of their maternal and neonatal care. The incidences of high-risk maternal conditions (pre-eclampsia with severe features, placenta previa with prior cesarean delivery, cardiac disease, pulmonary edema, and acute liver failure) were compared. To determine the potential referral burden, the percent of women with high-risk conditions delivering at a hospital without subspecialty maternal care but delivering in a county with a hospital with subspecialty maternal care was calculated. Results The analysis included 486,398 women who delivered at 544 hospitals, of which 104 (19%) and 182 (33%) had subspecialty maternal and neonatal care, respectively. Ninety-eight hospitals provided both subspecialty maternal and neonatal care; however, 84 hospitals provided only subspecialty neonatal care but no subspecialty maternal care. Among high-risk maternal conditions examined, approximately 65% of women delivered at a hospital with subspecialty maternal care. Of the remainder who delivered at a hospital without subspecialty maternal care, one-third were in a county where subspecialty care was present. For women with high-risk conditions who delivered in a county without subspecialty maternal care, the median distance to the closest county with subspecialty care was 52.8 miles (IQR 34.3-87.7 miles). Conclusion Approximately 50% of hospitals with subspecialty neonatal care do not provide subspecialty maternal care. This discordance may present a challenge when both high-risk maternal and neonatal conditions are present. Key Points High-risk women who deliver at hospitals without subspecialty care are in more rural areas. Approximately 50% of hospitals with subspecialty neonatal care do not provide subspecialty maternal care. This discordance may present a challenge when both high-risk maternal and neonatal conditions are present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Early online dateApr 20 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • delivery rate
  • high-risk conditions
  • levels of maternal care
  • maternal-fetal medicine
  • neonatal care
  • pregnancy characteristics
  • referral
  • regionalization
  • transfer

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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