Comparison of EO-1 Hyperion to AVIRIS for mapping forest composition in the Appalachian Mountains, USA

Philip A. Townsend, Jane R. Foster

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used classification and regression trees (CART) to map forest composition with Hyperion and AVIRIS in the Central Appalachian Mountains. Imagery from both sensors exhibited strong topographic effects, with AVIRIS also having a view-angle dependent brightness gradient across the image swath. A DEM-based empirical adjustment to reflectance levels was implemented to reduce apparent topographic effects in the imagery. In general, classification accuracy improved using the topographically normalized imagery, although it is possible that the adjustments to the AVIRIS imagery diminished the superior signal:noise performance of the AVIRIS imagery. Subtle distinctions in forest composition were detectable from both AVIRIS and Hyperion imagery, and despite the superior S:N and spatial resolution of AVIRIS, classification of Hyperion images was as accurate or more accurate than AVIRIS for most species. We therefore demonstrate the utility of Hyperion imagery, but note that further comparisons are still required. In particular, the effects of sensor artifacts (such as striping and "smile") must still be addressed when using Hyperion data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages793-795
Number of pages3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Event2002 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS 2002) - Toronto, Ont., Canada
Duration: Jun 24 2002Jun 28 2002

Other

Other2002 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS 2002)
CountryCanada
CityToronto, Ont.
Period6/24/026/28/02

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