Comparison of college students' blood pressure, perceived exertion, and psychosocial outcomes during virtual reality, exergaming, and traditional exercise: An exploratory study

Daniel J. McDonough, Zachary C. Pope, Nan Zeng, Wenxi Liu, Zan Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Integrating novel technologies, such as virtual reality (VR), into traditional exercise apparatuses (e.g., stationary bikes) may assist in promoting physical activity (PA) participation among young adults. Therefore, this study's purpose was to examine young adults' systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) change (BPpost - BPpre), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), enjoyment, and self-efficacy during VR, exergaming, and traditional stationary cycling sessions. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine college students (34 females; Mage = 23.6 ± 3.4 years; MBMI = 23.8 ± 3.1 kg/m2) participated in three separate 20-minute stationary cycling sessions: (1) PlayStation 4 VR; (2) Xbox 360 exergaming; and (3) traditional stationary cycling. Participants' systolic and diastolic BP change was measured by using an Omron HEM-705CP digital BP cuff. Further, RPE was assessed by using the modified Borg RPE Scale and enjoyment and self-efficacy were evaluated by using validated questionnaires. Results: A multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant differences for systolic BP change, RPE, enjoyment, and self-efficacy between the three cycling sessions (F(2, 144) = 3.3-32.4, P < 0.05, η2 = 0.04-0.3). Specifically, participants had significantly higher enjoyment and self-efficacy and lower RPE during VR cycling compared with the other two cycling sessions despite similar or higher change systolic BP during the VR cycling session. There was no statistically significant change in diastolic BP between the three cycling sessions (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Incorporating VR equipment with traditional stationary cycle ergometers may be favorable when seeking to promote enjoyable PA in college students. To further support VR exercise's efficacy, future studies with more rigorous research designs are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-296
Number of pages7
JournalGames for Health Journal
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Copyright 2020, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers 2020.

Keywords

  • Cycle ergometer
  • Enjoyment
  • Exercise
  • Exergaming
  • Rating of perceived exertion
  • Self-efficacy

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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