Comparison of APACHE II scoring in liver and kidney transplant recipients versus trauma and general surgical patients in a single intensive-care unit

R. G. Sawyer, C. G. Durbin, L. K. Rosenloi, T. L. Pruett

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Abstract

Over a 26-month period we assessed the ability of APACHE II, scored on admission to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU), to predict the in-hospital mortality of liver and kidney transplant recipients either post-operatively or after subsequent complications, and compared these results to non-transplant SICU admissions. There were 866 SICU admissions, of which 128 were liver transplant recipients, 112 were renal transplant recipients, 211 were trauma admissions and 415 were non-transplant/non-trauma admissions. In hospital mortalities among all liver transplant admissions were 0%, 10%, 38%, and 82% for APACHE II ranges of 0-10, 11-20, 21-30 and >30, respectively, with differences between the second and third, and third and fourth ranges significant (p≤0.05 by chi-square analysis). These differences were also seen when examining scores following the primary transplantation alone. Mortalities in corresponding APACHE II ranges for trauma and nontransplant/nontrauma admissions were similar. APACHE II scoring was not useful for renal transplant recipients, as it consistently overpredicted mortality. We conclude that APACHE II scoring may be useful in predicting outcome in post-operative liver transplant recipients, but is not useful in stratifying risk in renal transplant recipients due to the inherently low mortality involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-405
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume9
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Keywords

  • Kidney severity of illness scoring
  • Liver
  • Transplantation

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