Comparison between nonmydriatic spectral domain optical coherence tomography and conventional ophthalmologic examination in detecting adult macular pathology

Carl Joe Mehanna, Maamoun Abdul Fattah, Nicola Ghazi, Huda Sheheitli, Sandra S. Haddad, Randa S. Haddad, Haytham I. Salti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To compare nonmydriatic spectral domain optical coherence tomography (NMOCT) to comprehensive ophthalmologic evaluation (COE) in detecting adult macular abnormalities. Methods: This is a single-reader observational pilot study of adults older than 50 years with no known ophthalmologic problems to assess the correlation between NMOCT and COE in detecting macular abnormalities classified as epiretinal, intraretinal, subretinal, or a combination thereof. Subjects underwent NMOCT of the macula followed by COE which included a dilated fundus examination and ancillary tests as needed. Results: A total of 771 eyes of 406 patients were included. Cohen's kappa coefficient of agreement between NMOCT and COE for detecting any abnormality was high (0.90, p < 0.0001), with NMOCT having an overall sensitivity of 82.65% and specificity of 98.97%. Sensitivities and specificities of NMOCT in detecting each category of macular abnormalities were as follows: Epiretinal (86.36%, 99.73%), intraretinal (80.00%, 99.58%), and subretinal (88.89%, 99.73%), respectively. Conclusion: NMOCT is a promising tool for detecting adult macular abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-228
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmologica
Volume240
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adult population
  • Comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation
  • Correlation
  • Macula
  • Nonmydriatic optical coherence tomography
  • Screening
  • Sensitivity
  • Specificity

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