Comparing community and specialty provider-based recruitment in a randomized clinical trial: Clinical trial in fecal incontinence

Robin R. Whitebird, Donna Zimmaro Bliss, Kay Savik, Ann Lowry, Hans Joachim G. Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recruitment of participants to clinical trials remains a significant challenge, especially for research addressing topics of a sensitive nature such as fecal incontinence (FI). In the Fiber Study, a randomized controlled trial on symptom management for FI, we successfully enrolled 189 community-living adults through collaborations with specialty-based and community-based settings, each employing methods tailored to the organizational characteristics of their site. Results show that using the two settings increased racial and ethnic diversity of the sample and inclusion of informal caregivers. There were no differential effects on enrollment, final eligibility, or completion of protocol by site. Strategic collaborations with complementary sites can achieve sample recruitment goals for clinical trials on topics that are sensitive or known to be underreported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-511
Number of pages12
JournalResearch in Nursing and Health
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2011 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Cultural diversity
  • Fecal incontinence
  • Fiber
  • Randomized controlled trials
  • Recruitment
  • Retention

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