Comparative analysis of secretome profiles of manganese(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi

Carolyn A. Zeiner, Samuel O. Purvine, Erika M. Zink, Ljiljana Paša-Tolić, Dominique L. Chaput, Sajeet Haridas, Si Wu, Kurt LaButti, Igor V. Grigoriev, Bernard Henrissat, Cara M. Santelli, Colleen M. Hansel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0157844
JournalPloS one
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (www.nsf.gov), grant numbers EAR-1249489 and CBET-1336496, both awarded to CMH. Personal support for CAZ was also provided by Harvard University (www.harvard.edu) and by a Ford Foundation (www.fordfoundation.org) Predoctoral Fellowship administered by the National Academies. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. This research was performed under the Facilities Integrating Collaborations for User Science (FICUS) exploratory effort and used resources at the DOE Joint Genome Institute and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which are DOE Office of Science User Facilities. Both facilities are sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research and operated under Contract Nos. DE-AC02-05CH11231 (JGI) and DE-AC05-76RL01830 (EMSL). Part of this research was performed at the Bauer Core Facility of the FAS Center for Systems Biology at Harvard University. A portion of the bioinformatics analysis was performed at Harvard's FAS Research Computing facility. We thank Joshua Aldrich (EMSL) and Michele Clamp (Harvard) for bioinformatic analyses at various stages of this project, and Therese R. Clauss (EMSL) for expertise in LC-MS/MS instrumentation throughout this project. The authors disclaim endorsement of any products mentioned in this paper.

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