Comparative Analysis of Plant Demographic Traits Across Species of Different Conservation Concern: Implications for Pesticide Risk Assessment

Pamela Rueda-Cediel, Richard Brain, Nika Galic, Valery E Forbes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pesticide risk assessment for “listed” (threatened and endangered) plant species is hampered by a lack of quantitative demographic information. Demographic information for nonlisted plant species could provide risk-assessment data and inform recovery plans for listed species; however, it is unclear how representative demography of the former would be for the latter. We performed a comparison of plant demographic traits and elasticity metrics to explore how similar these are between listed and nonlisted species. We used transition matrices from the COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database to calculate population growth rate (λ), net reproductive rate (Ro), generation time (Tg), damping ratio (ρ), and summed elasticities for survival (stasis), growth, fertility (reproduction), and evenness of elasticity (EE). We compared these across species varying in conservation status and population trend. Phylogenetic generalized least squares (PGLS) models were used to evaluate differences between listed and nonlisted plants. Overall, demographic traits were largely overlapping for listed and nonlisted species. Population trends had a significant impact on most demographic traits and elasticity patterns. The influence of Tg on elasticity metrics was consistent across all data groupings. In contrast, the influence of λ on elasticity metrics was highly variable, and correlated in opposite directions in growing and declining populations. Our results suggested that population models developed for nonlisted plant species may be useful for assessing the risks of pesticides to listed species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2019;38:2043–2052.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2043-2052
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Elasticity
Pesticides
Risk assessment
elasticity
Conservation
risk assessment
pesticide
Demography
Population
recovery plan
Endangered Species
matrix
generation time
Population Growth
conservation status
Least-Squares Analysis
demography
damping
Reproduction
Fertility

Keywords

  • Ecological risk assessment
  • Elasticity
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Herbaceous plants
  • Pesticides
  • Population modeling

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Comparative Analysis of Plant Demographic Traits Across Species of Different Conservation Concern : Implications for Pesticide Risk Assessment. / Rueda-Cediel, Pamela; Brain, Richard; Galic, Nika; Forbes, Valery E.

In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 38, No. 9, 01.01.2019, p. 2043-2052.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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