Comment on Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness

Andrew T. Tredennick, Peter B. Adler, James B.Grace, W. Stanley Harpole, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, T. Michael Anderson, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori A. Biederman, Cynthia S. Brown, Yvonne M. Buckley, Chengjin Chu, Scott L. Collins, Michael J. Crawley, Philip A. Fay Jennifer Firn, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Andy Hector, Helmut HillebrandKevin Kirkman, Johannes M H Knops, Ramesh Laungani, Eric M. Lind, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Charles E. Mitchell, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, John L. Orrock, Pablo L. Peri, Suzanne M. Prober, Anita C. Risch, Martin Schütz, Karina L. Speziale, Rachel J. Standish, Lauren L. Sullivan, Glenda M. Wardle, Ryan J. Williams, Louie H. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fraser et al. (Reports, 17 July 2015, p. 302) report a unimodal relationship between productivity and species richness at regional and global scales, which they contrast with the results of Adler et al. (Reports, 23 September 2011, p. 1750). However, both data sets, when analyzed correctly, show clearly and consistently that productivity is a poor predictor of local species richness.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-a
JournalScience
Volume351
Issue number6272
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 29 2016

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