Comment on Scott A. Bollens's "In through the back door: Social equity and regional governance"

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The resurgence in regionalism is not coming about primarily because cities and suburbs see themselves as interdependent competitors in the global economy, as argued in Scott A. Bollens's "In Through the Back Door: Social Equity and Regional Governance." Instead, enough communities are finding tax equity programs, land use measures, and cooperative governance in their own self-interest to create gentle progress toward regional equity. However, regionalism lags in ending concentrated poverty and racial segregation because few civil rights organizations are raising these issues as fundamental to a regional agenda. The race issue is not being raised because of lack of understanding and because of competing visions on how to do it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9521459
Pages (from-to)659-668
Number of pages10
JournalHousing Policy Debate
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Keywords

  • Growth management
  • Poverty
  • Urban policy

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