Coming to America: Multiple origins of New World geckos

T. Gamble, A. M. Bauer, G. R. Colli, E. Greenbaum, T. R. Jackman, L. J. Vitt, A. M. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Geckos in the Western Hemisphere provide an excellent model to study faunal assembly at a continental scale. We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny, including exemplars of all New World gecko genera, to produce a biogeographical scenario for the New World geckos. Patterns of New World gecko origins are consistent with almost every biogeographical scenario utilized by a terrestrial vertebrate with different New World lineages showing evidence of vicariance, dispersal via temporary land bridge, overseas dispersal or anthropogenic introductions. We also recovered a strong relationship between clade age and species diversity, with older New World lineages having more species than more recently arrived lineages. Our data provide the first phylogenetic hypothesis for all New World geckos and highlight the intricate origins and ongoing organization of continental faunas. The phylogenetic and biogeographical hypotheses presented here provide an historical framework to further pursue research on the diversification and assembly of the New World herpetofauna.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of evolutionary biology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Gekkonidae
phylogeny
herpetofauna
phylogenetics
land bridge
vicariance
vertebrates
world
fauna
species diversity
vertebrate

Keywords

  • Biogeography
  • Dispersal
  • Gekkota
  • Phylogeny
  • South America
  • Squamata
  • Vicariance

Cite this

Gamble, T., Bauer, A. M., Colli, G. R., Greenbaum, E., Jackman, T. R., Vitt, L. J., & Simons, A. M. (2011). Coming to America: Multiple origins of New World geckos. Journal of evolutionary biology, 24(2), 231-244. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02184.x

Coming to America : Multiple origins of New World geckos. / Gamble, T.; Bauer, A. M.; Colli, G. R.; Greenbaum, E.; Jackman, T. R.; Vitt, L. J.; Simons, A. M.

In: Journal of evolutionary biology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 231-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gamble, T, Bauer, AM, Colli, GR, Greenbaum, E, Jackman, TR, Vitt, LJ & Simons, AM 2011, 'Coming to America: Multiple origins of New World geckos', Journal of evolutionary biology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 231-244. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02184.x
Gamble T, Bauer AM, Colli GR, Greenbaum E, Jackman TR, Vitt LJ et al. Coming to America: Multiple origins of New World geckos. Journal of evolutionary biology. 2011 Feb 1;24(2):231-244. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02184.x
Gamble, T. ; Bauer, A. M. ; Colli, G. R. ; Greenbaum, E. ; Jackman, T. R. ; Vitt, L. J. ; Simons, A. M. / Coming to America : Multiple origins of New World geckos. In: Journal of evolutionary biology. 2011 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 231-244.
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