Combining displacement field and grip force information to determine mechanical properties of planar tissue with complicated geometry

Tina M. Nagel, Mohammad F. Hadi, Amy A. Claeson, David J. Nuckley, Victor H Barocas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Performing planar biaxial testing and using nominal stress-strain curves for soft-tissue characterization is most suitable when (1) the test produces homogeneous strain fields, (2) fibers are aligned with the coordinate axes, and (3) strains are measured far from boundaries. Some tissue types [such as lamellae of the annulus fibrosus (AF)] may not allow for these conditions to be met due to their natural geometry and constitution. The objective of this work was to develop and test a method utilizing a surface displacement field, grip force-stretch data, and finite-element (FE) modeling to facilitate analysis of such complex samples. We evaluated the method by regressing a simple structural model to simulated and experimental data. Three different tissues with different characteristics were used: Superficial pectoralis major (SPM) (anisotropic, aligned with axes), facet capsular ligament (FCL) (anisotropic, aligned with axes, bone attached), and a lamella from the AF (anisotropic, aligned off-axis, bone attached). We found that the surface displacement field or the grip force-stretch data information alone is insufficient to determine a unique parameter set. Utilizing both data types provided tight confidence regions (CRs) of the regressed parameters and low parameter sensitivity to initial guess. This combined fitting approach provided robust characterization of tissues with varying fiber orientations and boundaries and is applicable to tissues that are poorly suited to standard biaxial testing. The structural model, a set of C++ finite-element routines, and a MATLAB routine to do the fitting based on a set of force/displacement data is provided in the online supplementary material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number114501
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume136
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Hand Strength
Tissue
Mechanical properties
Geometry
Structural Models
Bone
Bone and Bones
Ligaments
Constitution and Bylaws
Testing
Stress-strain curves
Fiber reinforced materials
MATLAB
Fibers
Annulus Fibrosus

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Combining displacement field and grip force information to determine mechanical properties of planar tissue with complicated geometry. / Nagel, Tina M.; Hadi, Mohammad F.; Claeson, Amy A.; Nuckley, David J.; Barocas, Victor H.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 136, No. 11, 114501, 01.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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