Combined Hartmann's Reversal and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Defining Postoperative Morbidity

Thomas Curran, Christine C. Jensen, Mary Kwaan, Robert D Madoff, Wolfgang B Gaertner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Ventral hernias are common after Hartmann's procedure and add complexity to Hartmann's reversal. Colostomy reversal and abdominal wall reconstruction may be performed in a staged or concurrent fashion, although data are limited as to which strategy is optimal. We aimed to define the complication profile of concurrent abdominal wall reconstruction with colostomy reversal as compared to either procedure alone. Materials and methods: For this retrospective cohort study, we used the National Surgery Quality Improvement Project Database from 2012 to 2015. All patients undergoing elective colostomy reversal, abdominal wall reconstruction with component separation, or combined colostomy reversal with component separation were identified. Propensity score matching was used to compare outcomes among similar patients undergoing colostomy reversal alone versus combined procedure. Groups were evaluated for postoperative morbidity including reoperation. Results: We identified 11,689 patients; 6951 (64%) underwent component separation alone, 4563 (35%) colostomy reversal alone, and 175 (1%) combined component separation and colostomy reversal. The combined group, as compared to colostomy reversal alone, showed an increased overall complication rate (39% versus 25%; P < 0.01) and increased rate of reoperation (9% versus 5%; P = 0.03). Differences in overall complication rate (43% versus 24%; P < 0.01) and reoperation rate (9% versus 3%; P = 0.03) persisted on propensity matched analysis. Conclusions: This analysis shows that in patients undergoing colostomy takedown, concurrent abdominal wall reconstruction is associated with increased morbidity including increased rate of reoperation, even when controlling for patient factors. Consideration may be given to a staged approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-144
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume240
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Colostomy
Abdominal Wall
Morbidity
Reoperation
Ventral Hernia
Propensity Score
Quality Improvement
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Databases

Keywords

  • Colostomy
  • Hartmann's reversal
  • Hernia

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Combined Hartmann's Reversal and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction : Defining Postoperative Morbidity. / Curran, Thomas; Jensen, Christine C.; Kwaan, Mary; Madoff, Robert D; Gaertner, Wolfgang B.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 240, 01.08.2019, p. 136-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Ventral hernias are common after Hartmann's procedure and add complexity to Hartmann's reversal. Colostomy reversal and abdominal wall reconstruction may be performed in a staged or concurrent fashion, although data are limited as to which strategy is optimal. We aimed to define the complication profile of concurrent abdominal wall reconstruction with colostomy reversal as compared to either procedure alone. Materials and methods: For this retrospective cohort study, we used the National Surgery Quality Improvement Project Database from 2012 to 2015. All patients undergoing elective colostomy reversal, abdominal wall reconstruction with component separation, or combined colostomy reversal with component separation were identified. Propensity score matching was used to compare outcomes among similar patients undergoing colostomy reversal alone versus combined procedure. Groups were evaluated for postoperative morbidity including reoperation. Results: We identified 11,689 patients; 6951 (64{\%}) underwent component separation alone, 4563 (35{\%}) colostomy reversal alone, and 175 (1{\%}) combined component separation and colostomy reversal. The combined group, as compared to colostomy reversal alone, showed an increased overall complication rate (39{\%} versus 25{\%}; P < 0.01) and increased rate of reoperation (9{\%} versus 5{\%}; P = 0.03). Differences in overall complication rate (43{\%} versus 24{\%}; P < 0.01) and reoperation rate (9{\%} versus 3{\%}; P = 0.03) persisted on propensity matched analysis. Conclusions: This analysis shows that in patients undergoing colostomy takedown, concurrent abdominal wall reconstruction is associated with increased morbidity including increased rate of reoperation, even when controlling for patient factors. Consideration may be given to a staged approach.",
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AU - Gaertner, Wolfgang B

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