Collective satiation: How coexperience accelerates a decline in hedonic judgments

Rajesh P. Bhargave, Nicole Votolato Montgomery, Joseph P Redden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Individuals often mutually experience a stimulus with a relationship partner or social group (e.g., snacking with friends). Yet, little is currently understood about how a sense of coexperiencing affects hedonic judgments of experiences that unfold over time. Research on the shared attention state has suggested that hedonic judgments are intensified when individuals coexperience a stimulus (vs. experiencing it alone), and other related work has found that the social environment influences hedonic judgments in shared (vs. solo) experiences. Although this past work has focused on judgments of single instances of a stimulus, the present work examines how coexperience affects hedonic judgments of stimuli over time. This work documents the 'collective satiation effect' wherein satiation-a diminished enjoyment of pleasant stimuli with repeated experience-is accelerated by a sense of coexperiencing the stimulus with others. We propose that this happens because shared attention makes the repetitive nature of the experience more salient, by promoting and incorporating thoughts of others also repeatedly having the same shared experience. Five studies document the collective satiation effect, support the proposed mechanism, and show moderators of the effect. Taken together, this research contributes to an understanding of how the social environment influences the experience of hedonic stimuli, which has broad implications for the value individuals place on the time that they spend with others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-546
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume114
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Satiation
Pleasure
stimulus
Social Environment
experience
Snacks
Research
partner relationship
moderator

Keywords

  • Hedonic judgments
  • Satiation
  • Shared experiences
  • Social context

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Collective satiation : How coexperience accelerates a decline in hedonic judgments. / Bhargave, Rajesh P.; Montgomery, Nicole Votolato; Redden, Joseph P.

In: Journal of personality and social psychology, Vol. 114, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 529-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bhargave, Rajesh P. ; Montgomery, Nicole Votolato ; Redden, Joseph P. / Collective satiation : How coexperience accelerates a decline in hedonic judgments. In: Journal of personality and social psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 114, No. 4. pp. 529-546.
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