Collective narcissism and the growth of conspiracy thinking over the course of the 2016 United States presidential election: A longitudinal analysis

Agnieszka Golec de Zavala, Christopher M. Federico

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data from a longitudinal study of American adults collected between July and November 2016, we examine the hypothesis that American collective narcissism (CN) would uniquely predict increases in conspiracy thinking during the 2016 presidential campaign. Going beyond previous findings, our results indicate that CN (but not in-group identification) predicted growth in general conspiracy thinking—that is, a tendency to view political events in terms of group-based conspiracies—over the course of the 2016 US presidential campaign. This relationship is found even after accounting for other predictors such as demographics, political knowledge, social trust, authoritarianism, and need for cognitive closure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1011-1018
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume48
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keywords

  • collective narcissism
  • conspiracy thinking
  • presidential campaign

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