Collaborative discourse and the modeling of solution chemistry with magnetic 3D physical models-impact and characterization

Abdi Rizak M Warfa, Gillian H. Roehrig, Jamie L. Schneider, James Nyachwaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant body of the literature in science education examines students' conceptions of the dissolution of ionic solids in water, often showing that students lack proper understanding of the particulate nature of dissolving materials as well as holding numerous misconceptions about the dissolution process. Consequently, chemical educators have explored several instructional strategies to address this issue including the use of multimedia, computer animations, and hands-on activities. In this paper, we describe the ways in which the use of physical 3D magnetic molecular models during a cooperative inquiry-based activity on chemical bonding prompted classroom discourse on what counts as chemically justifiable and appropriate representations of dissolved ionic solids in water. In so doing, we use the intersection of science education and technology to research the role of models in science teaching, the nature of classroom discourse initiated by modeling activities, and unfolding changes in student conceptions and ultimately student learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)835-848
Number of pages14
JournalChemistry Education Research and Practice
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Fingerprint

chemistry
Students
discourse
Dissolution
student
Education
science
water
classroom
Water
Animation
multimedia
education
Teaching
educator
lack
learning

Cite this

Collaborative discourse and the modeling of solution chemistry with magnetic 3D physical models-impact and characterization. / Warfa, Abdi Rizak M; Roehrig, Gillian H.; Schneider, Jamie L.; Nyachwaya, James.

In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.10.2014, p. 835-848.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{85e5b97f2a4745feb1fe511b93f9c8df,
title = "Collaborative discourse and the modeling of solution chemistry with magnetic 3D physical models-impact and characterization",
abstract = "A significant body of the literature in science education examines students' conceptions of the dissolution of ionic solids in water, often showing that students lack proper understanding of the particulate nature of dissolving materials as well as holding numerous misconceptions about the dissolution process. Consequently, chemical educators have explored several instructional strategies to address this issue including the use of multimedia, computer animations, and hands-on activities. In this paper, we describe the ways in which the use of physical 3D magnetic molecular models during a cooperative inquiry-based activity on chemical bonding prompted classroom discourse on what counts as chemically justifiable and appropriate representations of dissolved ionic solids in water. In so doing, we use the intersection of science education and technology to research the role of models in science teaching, the nature of classroom discourse initiated by modeling activities, and unfolding changes in student conceptions and ultimately student learning.",
author = "Warfa, {Abdi Rizak M} and Roehrig, {Gillian H.} and Schneider, {Jamie L.} and James Nyachwaya",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1039/c4rp00119b",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "835--848",
journal = "Chemistry Education Research and Practice",
issn = "1109-4028",
publisher = "Ioannina University School of Medicine",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Collaborative discourse and the modeling of solution chemistry with magnetic 3D physical models-impact and characterization

AU - Warfa, Abdi Rizak M

AU - Roehrig, Gillian H.

AU - Schneider, Jamie L.

AU - Nyachwaya, James

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - A significant body of the literature in science education examines students' conceptions of the dissolution of ionic solids in water, often showing that students lack proper understanding of the particulate nature of dissolving materials as well as holding numerous misconceptions about the dissolution process. Consequently, chemical educators have explored several instructional strategies to address this issue including the use of multimedia, computer animations, and hands-on activities. In this paper, we describe the ways in which the use of physical 3D magnetic molecular models during a cooperative inquiry-based activity on chemical bonding prompted classroom discourse on what counts as chemically justifiable and appropriate representations of dissolved ionic solids in water. In so doing, we use the intersection of science education and technology to research the role of models in science teaching, the nature of classroom discourse initiated by modeling activities, and unfolding changes in student conceptions and ultimately student learning.

AB - A significant body of the literature in science education examines students' conceptions of the dissolution of ionic solids in water, often showing that students lack proper understanding of the particulate nature of dissolving materials as well as holding numerous misconceptions about the dissolution process. Consequently, chemical educators have explored several instructional strategies to address this issue including the use of multimedia, computer animations, and hands-on activities. In this paper, we describe the ways in which the use of physical 3D magnetic molecular models during a cooperative inquiry-based activity on chemical bonding prompted classroom discourse on what counts as chemically justifiable and appropriate representations of dissolved ionic solids in water. In so doing, we use the intersection of science education and technology to research the role of models in science teaching, the nature of classroom discourse initiated by modeling activities, and unfolding changes in student conceptions and ultimately student learning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908660858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908660858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/c4rp00119b

DO - 10.1039/c4rp00119b

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 835

EP - 848

JO - Chemistry Education Research and Practice

JF - Chemistry Education Research and Practice

SN - 1109-4028

IS - 4

ER -