Cognitive impairment and quality-of-life: Views of providers of long-term care services

Charles E. Gessert, Kathryn Hyer, Robert L. Kane, Todd Rockwood, Andrea B. Brassard, Karen Desjardins, Rosalie A. Kane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Quality-of-life (QoL) is now recognized as a principal outcome marker for long-term care. However, QoL is difficult to define and measure, especially in residents with dementia. Providers of long-term care services (n = 182) were asked to rate the importance of 19 psychosocial quality-of-life elements for hypothetical residents with physical impairment and for residents with cognitive impairment. Respondents also were asked to rate their ability to influence these elements for each type of resident. Respondents rated the importance of 18 of the 19 elements and their ability to influence 17 of 19 elements lower for residents with cognitive impairment. Of the five types of respondents, certified nursing assistants (CNAs) rated their ability to influence these QoL elements the highest for both types of residents; physicians' ratings were the lowest. Pain management was given high ratings for both importance and ability to influence for both resident types; the lowest ratings were given for elements that pertained to residents' understanding. A strong correlation between ratings for importance and ability to influence was observed. Additional research is needed on the psychosocial aspects of long-term care residents' QoL, especially those with cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-90
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer disease and associated disorders
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005

Keywords

  • Caregivers
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Long-term care
  • Nursing homes
  • Quality-of-life

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cognitive impairment and quality-of-life: Views of providers of long-term care services'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this