Cognitive, emotional, and behavioral contributors to early childhood weight status

Amy C Gross, Alexander M. Kaizer, David M Vock, Sana Siddiqui, Claudia K Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pediatric obesity is a serious public health concern affecting almost 16% of two- to five-year-olds. Prior research has not sufficiently addressed how various factors combine to contribute to the heterogeneous condition of obesity. The goal of this study was to assess multiple individual factors to determine how they collectively contribute to weight status in young children, as this information could lead to tailored interventions. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of three- to five-year-olds. Child height and weight were measured. Parents completed a demographic survey and validated questionnaires regarding these child characteristics: internalizing and externalizing behaviors, sleep problems, executive functions, and food approach and food avoid behaviors. Data for 154 participants (mean age: 4.4 ± 0.8 years; mean body mass index-z:.28 ± 1.0; 50% male) were analyzed using linear and logistic regression and a stepwise regression procedure. In the stepwise selection procedure for the binary outcome of obese/overweight versus normal weight, food avoid (p =.151), food approach (p =.017), and the White demographic variable (p =.117) were identified as important predictors. In conclusion, when considering various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral factors, only food approach and food avoid eating behaviors predicted weight status in young children, suggesting prevention and intervention efforts should specifically address these aspects in young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-391
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Child Health Care
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Fingerprint

Weights and Measures
Food
Demography
Pediatric Obesity
Executive Function
Feeding Behavior
Linear Models
Sleep
Body Mass Index
Public Health
Obesity
Parents
Logistic Models
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • eating behavior
  • executive function
  • externalizing behavior
  • internalizing behavior
  • pediatric obesity

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Cognitive, emotional, and behavioral contributors to early childhood weight status. / Gross, Amy C; Kaizer, Alexander M.; Vock, David M; Siddiqui, Sana; Fox, Claudia K.

In: Journal of Child Health Care, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 382-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{56dedcccb43a4e92ac8ddd7947dde3ef,
title = "Cognitive, emotional, and behavioral contributors to early childhood weight status",
abstract = "Pediatric obesity is a serious public health concern affecting almost 16{\%} of two- to five-year-olds. Prior research has not sufficiently addressed how various factors combine to contribute to the heterogeneous condition of obesity. The goal of this study was to assess multiple individual factors to determine how they collectively contribute to weight status in young children, as this information could lead to tailored interventions. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of three- to five-year-olds. Child height and weight were measured. Parents completed a demographic survey and validated questionnaires regarding these child characteristics: internalizing and externalizing behaviors, sleep problems, executive functions, and food approach and food avoid behaviors. Data for 154 participants (mean age: 4.4 ± 0.8 years; mean body mass index-z:.28 ± 1.0; 50{\%} male) were analyzed using linear and logistic regression and a stepwise regression procedure. In the stepwise selection procedure for the binary outcome of obese/overweight versus normal weight, food avoid (p =.151), food approach (p =.017), and the White demographic variable (p =.117) were identified as important predictors. In conclusion, when considering various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral factors, only food approach and food avoid eating behaviors predicted weight status in young children, suggesting prevention and intervention efforts should specifically address these aspects in young children.",
keywords = "Early childhood, eating behavior, executive function, externalizing behavior, internalizing behavior, pediatric obesity",
author = "Gross, {Amy C} and Kaizer, {Alexander M.} and Vock, {David M} and Sana Siddiqui and Fox, {Claudia K}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1367493519852462",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "382--391",
journal = "Journal of Child Health Care",
issn = "1367-4935",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive, emotional, and behavioral contributors to early childhood weight status

AU - Gross, Amy C

AU - Kaizer, Alexander M.

AU - Vock, David M

AU - Siddiqui, Sana

AU - Fox, Claudia K

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Pediatric obesity is a serious public health concern affecting almost 16% of two- to five-year-olds. Prior research has not sufficiently addressed how various factors combine to contribute to the heterogeneous condition of obesity. The goal of this study was to assess multiple individual factors to determine how they collectively contribute to weight status in young children, as this information could lead to tailored interventions. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of three- to five-year-olds. Child height and weight were measured. Parents completed a demographic survey and validated questionnaires regarding these child characteristics: internalizing and externalizing behaviors, sleep problems, executive functions, and food approach and food avoid behaviors. Data for 154 participants (mean age: 4.4 ± 0.8 years; mean body mass index-z:.28 ± 1.0; 50% male) were analyzed using linear and logistic regression and a stepwise regression procedure. In the stepwise selection procedure for the binary outcome of obese/overweight versus normal weight, food avoid (p =.151), food approach (p =.017), and the White demographic variable (p =.117) were identified as important predictors. In conclusion, when considering various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral factors, only food approach and food avoid eating behaviors predicted weight status in young children, suggesting prevention and intervention efforts should specifically address these aspects in young children.

AB - Pediatric obesity is a serious public health concern affecting almost 16% of two- to five-year-olds. Prior research has not sufficiently addressed how various factors combine to contribute to the heterogeneous condition of obesity. The goal of this study was to assess multiple individual factors to determine how they collectively contribute to weight status in young children, as this information could lead to tailored interventions. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of three- to five-year-olds. Child height and weight were measured. Parents completed a demographic survey and validated questionnaires regarding these child characteristics: internalizing and externalizing behaviors, sleep problems, executive functions, and food approach and food avoid behaviors. Data for 154 participants (mean age: 4.4 ± 0.8 years; mean body mass index-z:.28 ± 1.0; 50% male) were analyzed using linear and logistic regression and a stepwise regression procedure. In the stepwise selection procedure for the binary outcome of obese/overweight versus normal weight, food avoid (p =.151), food approach (p =.017), and the White demographic variable (p =.117) were identified as important predictors. In conclusion, when considering various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral factors, only food approach and food avoid eating behaviors predicted weight status in young children, suggesting prevention and intervention efforts should specifically address these aspects in young children.

KW - Early childhood

KW - eating behavior

KW - executive function

KW - externalizing behavior

KW - internalizing behavior

KW - pediatric obesity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067834945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067834945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1367493519852462

DO - 10.1177/1367493519852462

M3 - Article

C2 - 31159558

AN - SCOPUS:85067834945

VL - 23

SP - 382

EP - 391

JO - Journal of Child Health Care

JF - Journal of Child Health Care

SN - 1367-4935

IS - 3

ER -