Cognitive-behavioral group treatment for driving-related anger, aggression, and risky driving in combat veterans: A pilot study

Thad Strom, Jennie Leskela, Elizabeth Possis, Paul Thuras, Melanie E. Leuty, Bridget M. Doane, Kathryn Wilder-Schaaf, Lisa Rosenzweig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined the preliminary effects of an 8-session group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) designed to reduce driving-related anger, aggression, and risky driving behaviors in veterans. Participants (N = 9) with self-reported aggressive and risky driving problems completed self-report measures at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. Of those completing the treatment, 89% demonstrated reliable change in driving-related aggression and 67% evidenced reliable change in driving-related anger. Similar changes were found for secondary treatment targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-408
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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