Cochlear implantation in severe traumatic brain injury and paranoid schizophrenia: Two case studies

Jane T. Siegal, William Robiner, Sharon Smith, Samuel C. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In view of the demanding instruction and training requirements associatedwith cochlear implantation, patients with cognitive impairments have typically been considered to be poor candidates for this procedure. This presumption persists inpart because experience and research in this area are limited. We describe our experience with implanting cochlear devices in 2 patients who had significant psychological impairments; 1 patient had experienced a severe brain injury, and the other had paranoid schizophrenia. Nevertheless, both patients were able to follow the implant training program, and they experienced different degrees of improvement in their hearing. We discuss our preoperative evaluations of these patients and the key factors that led to our decision to proceed with surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-508
Number of pages11
JournalEar, Nose and Throat Journal
Volume84
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

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