Coarse woody debris stocks as a function of forest type and stand age in Costa Rican tropical dry forest: Long-lasting legacies of previous land use

Lisa B. Kissing, Jennifer S. Powers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ecological importance of trees lasts much longer than their life spans. Standing dead trees (snags) and fallen trunks and branches are an important component of above-ground carbon stocks and nutrient reserves, provide habitat for wildlife, and interact with disturbance regimes (e.g. by serving as fuel for fires) (Clark et al. 2002, Harmon et al. 1986, Pyle et al. 2008). Despite these diverse functions, woody debris stocks remain poorly quantified in tropical forests in general (Brown 1997), and in tropical dry forests in particular (Harmon et al. 1995). More empirical studies of the patterns of woody debris and processes that control its dynamics are needed to understand its role in global biogeochemical cycles and for ecosystem simulation models, many of which do not represent coarse woody debris (CWD) as a separate pool (Cornwell et al. 2009).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-471
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Tropical Ecology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Keywords

  • carbon stocks
  • coarse woody debris
  • secondary succession
  • tropical dry forest

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