Closely related NAC transcription factors of tomato differentially regulate stomatal closure and reopening during pathogen attack

Minmin Du, Qingzhe Zhai, Lei Deng, Shuyu Li, Hongshuang Li, Liuhua Yan, Zhuo Huang, Bao Wang, Hongling Jiang, Tingting Huang, Chang Bao Li, Jianing Wei, Li Kang, Jingfu Li, Chuanyou Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

To restrict pathogen entry, plants close stomata as an integral part of innate immunity. To counteract this defense, Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato produces coronatine (COR), which mimics jasmonic acid (JA), to reopen stomata for bacterial entry. It is believed that abscisic acid (ABA) plays a central role in regulating bacteria-triggered stomatal closure and that stomatal reopening requires the JA/COR pathway, but the downstream signaling events remain unclear. We studied the stomatal immunity of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and report here the distinct roles of two homologous NAC (for NAM, ATAF1, 2, and CUC2) transcription factors, JA2 (for jasmonic acid2) and JA2L (for JA2-like), in regulating pathogen-triggered stomatal movement. ABA activates JA2 expression, and genetic manipulation of JA2 revealed its positive role in ABA-mediated stomatal closure. We show that JA2 exerts this effect by regulating the expression of an ABA biosynthetic gene. By contrast, JA and COR activate JA2L expression, and genetic manipulation of JA2L revealed its positive role in JA/COR-mediated stomatal reopening. We show that JA2L executes this effect by regulating the expression of genes involved in the metabolism of salicylic acid. Thus, these closely related NAC proteins differentially regulate pathogen-induced stomatal closure and reopening through distinct mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3167-3184
Number of pages18
JournalPlant Cell
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

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