Close linkage of the mouse and human CD3 gamma- and delta-chain genes suggests that their transcription is controlled by common regulatory elements.

H. Saito, T. Koyama, K. Georgopoulos, H. Clevers, W. G. Haser, T. LeBien, S. Tonegawa, C. Terhorst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antigen receptors on the T-cell surface are noncovalently associated with at least four invariant polypeptide chains, CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta. The mouse CD3-gamma gene, consisting of seven exons, was found to be highly homologous to the CD3-delta gene described earlier. Both the high level of sequence homology and the exon/intron organization indicate that the CD3-gamma and -delta genes arose by gene duplication. Surprisingly, murine and human genomic DNA clones could be isolated that contained elements of both the CD3-gamma and CD3-delta genes. In fact, the putative transcription start site of the mouse CD3-gamma gene is less than 1.4 kilobases from the transcription initiation site of the mouse CD3-delta gene. Common elements that regulate the divergent transcription of the two genes are therefore proposed to be located in the intervening 1.4-kilobase DNA segment. This might contribute to the coordinate expression of the CD3-gamma and -delta genes during intrathymic maturation of T lymphocytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9131-9134
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume84
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1987

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