Clinical utility of the IRF: assessment of erythroid regeneration following parvo B19 infection.

Janis Wyrick-Glatzel, Janice Conway-Klaassen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parvo B19 (Fifth disease) is an erythrotropic virus which attaches through the 'P' globoside receptor on the surface of human red blood cells and precursors. This typically benign viral infection can cause a transient aplastic anemia in patients with underlying red cell disorders. In this case, a two-year-old child presents with severe aplastic anemia without evidence of underlying disease. Erythroid regeneration is monitored through the use of the immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and is demonstrated by the presence of high and medium fluorescence reticulocytes in the peripheral blood three to five days prior to the peak in absolute reticulocytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-212
Number of pages5
JournalClinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 1 2002

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