Clinical teaching effectiveness described in relation to learning outcomes of baccalaureate nursing students.

K. Krichbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Grounded in cumulative findings on teaching effectiveness from K-12 education, higher education, and professional education, this process-product study empirically explored the relationship between 24 specific teacher behaviors generally thought to be effective for student learning and learning outcomes of baccalaureate nursing students. Two measures of learning in a critical care practicum taught by staff nurse preceptors were used: performance in the practicum as assessed on a clinical evaluation instrument developed by faculty, and performance on a standardized test of knowledge in critical care. Important aspects of clinical teaching effectiveness included the ability to set clear objectives to help students organize their learning, to ask appropriate questions, to provide specific and timely feedback to students, and to convey a positive, concerned attitude. Certain teaching behaviors showed significant relationships with cognitive learning outcomes, while others were tied to performance outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-316
Number of pages11
JournalThe Journal of nursing education
Volume33
Issue number7
StatePublished - Sep 1994
Externally publishedYes

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