Clinical Supervision Practices of Licensed Psychologists

Patricia M Veach, Donna Kulakowski, Julie A. Kenfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Licensed psychologists from 1 midwestern state were surveyed to assess the nature of clinical supervision for experienced practitioners. Data were collected concerning type, frequency, and content of supervision; supervisor goals, techniques, assessment methods, and roles; and most and least helpful aspects of supervision. There were few significant differences in supervision as a function of supervisee experience, gender, or degree (MA vs. PhD), or supervisor gender. The supervisees generally appeared to have autonomous relationships with supervisors who were clinically skilled and highly supportive. Several ethical concerns regarding supervisee informed consent, supervisor accountability, and gender-role stereotyping are discussed, and recommendations for additional research are made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-181
Number of pages5
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1994

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Psychology
Stereotyping
Social Responsibility
Informed Consent
Research

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Clinical Supervision Practices of Licensed Psychologists. / Veach, Patricia M; Kulakowski, Donna; Kenfield, Julie A.

In: Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.05.1994, p. 177-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Veach, Patricia M ; Kulakowski, Donna ; Kenfield, Julie A. / Clinical Supervision Practices of Licensed Psychologists. In: Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 1994 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 177-181.
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