Clinical significance of sonographic findings in the abnormal but intact rotator cuff: A preliminary report

Jeffrey R. Crass, Edward V. Craig, Samuel B. Feinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Shoulder pain is a common orthopedic problem. Clinical examination is often nonspecific and arthrography is normal in those patients with the most frequent cause of shoulder pain—noncalcific tendonitis secondary to impingement. Ultrasonography has recently shown itself to be of value in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. In addition to the diagnosis of tears, however, sonography can demonstrate abnormalities within the intact rotator cuff tendon. These abnormalities consist of changes in echogenicity and thickness of the tendon. The patterns of abnormality demonstrated correlate with pathologic changes seen in tendonitis. This preliminary study suggests that the ability to demonstrate an abnormal rotator cuff tendon has potential for becoming a valuable aid to the orthopedist in allowing confident diagnosis of rotator cuff disease in the presence of nonspecific symptomatology and an intact tendon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-634
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Ultrasound
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Keywords

  • Arthrography
  • Rotator cuff tears
  • Shoulder pain
  • Tendonitis, noncalcific

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