Clinical implications of age-related change of the mandibular plane angle

Anna M. Hardin, Manish Valiathan, Heesoo Oh, Ryan P. Knigge, Kieran P. McNulty, Emily V. Leary, Dana L. Duren, Richard J. Sherwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To identify trajectories of ontogenetic change in the mandibular plane angle (MPA) and to describe the influence of sex and other factors on MPA during growth. Setting/Sample: The data consisted of 7026 MPA measurements from lateral cephalographs representing longitudinal series from ages 6 to 21 for 728 individuals from the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS). Materials and Methods: Facial type was determined from MPA for each assessment, with the assessment closest to age 18 representing the adult facial type. The sample includes 366 males and 362 females, each with between 2 and 15 cephalographs. The mean number of cephalographs per individual is 10. Variation in childhood MPA (earliest assessment between 6 and 9 years of age) and adult MPA (closest assessment to age 18 between 15 and 21 years of age), and change in MPA from childhood to adulthood were compared by sex and adult facial type using ANOVA and post hoc t tests. Results: Mandibular plane angle decreased from childhood to adulthood in 92% of males and 81% of females, yet increased in 36% of males and 50% of females with the hyper-divergent adult facial type. Childhood MPA and overall change in MPA were significantly different by adult facial type. Conclusions: Adult facial type is associated with differences in childhood MPA and change in MPA during growth. There are multiple ontogenetic pathways by which an individual can achieve a normo-divergent adult facial type, and an individual's childhood MPA does not necessarily correspond to his or her adult facial type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-58
Number of pages9
JournalOrthodontics and Craniofacial Research
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The research programme of the Craniofacial Growth Consortium is indebted to the numerous investigators, researchers and staff who contributed their time and effort into the studies now combined into the CGCS. Support for these studies was provided by numerous agencies, foundations and institutions. The authors extend their special thanks to the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers R01DE024732?and F32DE029104. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Most importantly, we are grateful for the long-term commitment of the almost 2,000 study participants who make up the overall study sample. These individuals have rightfully earned a place of honour in the history of human growth, development and ageing.

Funding Information:
The research programme of the Craniofacial Growth Consortium is indebted to the numerous investigators, researchers and staff who contributed their time and effort into the studies now combined into the CGCS. Support for these studies was provided by numerous agencies, foundations and institutions. The authors extend their special thanks to the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers R01DE024732 and F32DE029104. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Most importantly, we are grateful for the long‐term commitment of the almost 2,000 study participants who make up the overall study sample. These individuals have rightfully earned a place of honour in the history of human growth, development and ageing.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • cephalometry
  • craniofacial growth
  • longitudinal studies

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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