Clinical efficacy and safety of surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) in the treatment of benign skull base tumors

Steven K M Lau, Kunal Patel, Teddy Kim, Erik Knipprath, Gwe Ya Kim, Laura I. Cerviño, Joshua D. Lawson, Kevin T. Murphy, Parag Sanghvi, Bob S. Carter, Clark C. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Frameless, surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) is a novel platform for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) wherein patient positioning is monitored in real-time through infra-red camera tracking of facial topography. Here we describe our initial clinical experience with SIG-RS for the treatment of benign neoplasms of the skull base. We identified 48 patients with benign skull base tumors consecutively treated with SIG-RS at a single institution between 2009 and 2011. Patients were diagnosed with meningioma (n = 22), vestibular schwannoma (n = 20), or nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (n = 6). Local control and treatment-related toxicity were retrospectively assessed. Median follow-up was 65 months (range 61–72 months). Prescription doses were 12–13 Gy in a single fraction (n = 18), 8 Gy × 3 fractions (n = 6), and 5 Gy × 5 fractions (n = 24). Actuarial tumor control rate at 5 years was 98%. No grade ≥3 treatment-related toxicity was observed. Grade ≤2 toxicity was associated with symptomatic lesions (p = 0.049) and single fraction treatment (p = 0.005). SIG-RS for benign skull base tumors produces clinical outcomes comparable to conventional frame-based SRS techniques while enhancing patient comfort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-312
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of neuro-oncology
Volume132
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Benign skull base tumor
  • Frameless radiosurgery
  • Image guided radiosurgery
  • SIG-RS
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery
  • Surface imaging guided radiosurgery

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