Clinical differentiation of acute necrotizing from chronic nonsuppurative pancreatitis in cats: 63 Cases (1996-2001)

Jean A. Ferreri, Erin Hardam, Susan E. Kimmel, H. Mark Saunders, Thomas J. Van Winkle, Kenneth J. Drobatz, Robert J. Washabau

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To characterize clinical, clinicopathologic, radiographic, and ultrasonographic findings in cats with histologically confirmed acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) or chronic nonsuppurative pancreatitis (CP) and identify features that may be useful in the antemortem differentiation of these disorders. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 63 cats with histologically confirmed ANP (n = 30) or CP (33). Procedure - Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical signs, concurrent diseases, clinicopathologic findings, and results of radiography and ultrasonography. Results - Cats in both groups had similar nonspecific clinical signs, physical examination findings, and radiographic and ultrasonographic abnormalities. Abdominal ultrasonographic abnormalities, including hypoechoic pancreas, hyperechoic mesentery, and abdominal effusion, were found in cats in both groups and, therefore, were not specific for ANP. Cats with CP were significantly more likely to have concurrent diseases than were cats with ANP (100 and 83%, respectively). Clinicopathologic abnormalities were similar between groups; however, serum alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher in cats with CP. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that ANP and CP in cats cannot be distinguished from each other solely on the basis of history, physical examination findings, results of clinicopathologic testing, radiographic abnormalities, or ultrasonographic abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-474
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume223
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2003

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pancreatitis
Chronic Pancreatitis
Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis
Cats
cats
Physical Examination
Cat Diseases
clinical examination
Mesentery
Alanine Transaminase
Radiography
Medical Records
Alkaline Phosphatase
mesentery
Pancreas
Ultrasonography
Retrospective Studies
History
radiography
alanine transaminase

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Clinical differentiation of acute necrotizing from chronic nonsuppurative pancreatitis in cats : 63 Cases (1996-2001). / Ferreri, Jean A.; Hardam, Erin; Kimmel, Susan E.; Saunders, H. Mark; Van Winkle, Thomas J.; Drobatz, Kenneth J.; Washabau, Robert J.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 223, No. 4, 15.08.2003, p. 469-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ferreri, Jean A. ; Hardam, Erin ; Kimmel, Susan E. ; Saunders, H. Mark ; Van Winkle, Thomas J. ; Drobatz, Kenneth J. ; Washabau, Robert J. / Clinical differentiation of acute necrotizing from chronic nonsuppurative pancreatitis in cats : 63 Cases (1996-2001). In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2003 ; Vol. 223, No. 4. pp. 469-474.
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