Chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: past, present, and future

for Investigators of the Project on the BIOsphere and the COSmos (BIOCOS) and Members of the Phoenix Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research at the Halberg Chronobiology Center focused to a large extent on the monitoring of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Self-measurements and later ambulatory BP monitoring yielded new knowledge of interest to basic science and clinical practice. After a brief review of BP measurement, we outline developments in methods of data analysis that paralleled technological advances in the measurement of BP. We review work done in cooperation with colleagues worldwide to illustrate how a chronobiological approach led to the mapping of spontaneous circadian and other rhythms for the derivation of refined reference values and to the assessment of response rhythms underlying chronotherapy. BIOCOS members work in different fields, spanning from cardiology and nutrition to obesity, diabetes, exercise physiology and rehabilitation, but all strive for “pre-habilitation”. The early recognition of increased risk can prompt the timely institution of prophylactic intervention. As technology continues to improve, studies on groups are complemented by longitudinal self-surveillance for health maintenance. Longitudinal records serve for the investigation of environmental influences on human physiology, the topic of chronomics. As current advances in technology and wireless communication will likely impact the future of healthcare, chronobiological methods and concepts should be an integral part of this seachange.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-62
Number of pages17
JournalBiological Rhythm Research
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

Fingerprint

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
blood pressure
blood
Blood Pressure
monitoring
Chronotherapy
Wireless Technology
Exercise Therapy
cardiology
human physiology
Circadian Rhythm
Cardiology
obesity
diabetes
Reference Values
Rehabilitation
Obesity
Heart Rate
Communication
health services

Keywords

  • Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM)
  • Blood Pressure Measurement
  • Chronodesm
  • Chronomics
  • Cosinor
  • Marker-rhythm-based chronotherapy
  • Prehabilitation
  • Sphygmochron
  • Vascular Variability Disorders (VVDs)

Cite this

for Investigators of the Project on the BIOsphere and the COSmos (BIOCOS) and Members of the Phoenix Study Group (2019). Chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: past, present, and future. Biological Rhythm Research, 50(1), 46-62. https://doi.org/10.1080/09291016.2018.1491193

Chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory blood pressure monitoring : past, present, and future. / for Investigators of the Project on the BIOsphere and the COSmos (BIOCOS) and Members of the Phoenix Study Group.

In: Biological Rhythm Research, Vol. 50, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 46-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

for Investigators of the Project on the BIOsphere and the COSmos (BIOCOS) and Members of the Phoenix Study Group 2019, 'Chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: past, present, and future', Biological Rhythm Research, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 46-62. https://doi.org/10.1080/09291016.2018.1491193
for Investigators of the Project on the BIOsphere and the COSmos (BIOCOS) and Members of the Phoenix Study Group. Chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: past, present, and future. Biological Rhythm Research. 2019 Jan 2;50(1):46-62. https://doi.org/10.1080/09291016.2018.1491193
for Investigators of the Project on the BIOsphere and the COSmos (BIOCOS) and Members of the Phoenix Study Group. / Chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory blood pressure monitoring : past, present, and future. In: Biological Rhythm Research. 2019 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 46-62.
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