Chronic wasting disease in cervids: Implications for prion transmission to humans and other animal species

Michael T. Osterholm, Cory J. Anderson, Mark D. Zabel, Joni M. Scheftel, Kristine A. Moore, Brian S. Appleby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion-related transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids, including deer, elk, reindeer, sika deer, and moose. CWD has been confirmed in at least 26 U.S. states, three Canadian provinces, South Korea, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, with a notable increase in the past 5 years. The continued geographic spread of this disease increases the frequency of exposure to CWD prions among cervids, humans, and other animal species. Since CWD is now an established wildlife disease in North America, proactive steps, where possible, should be taken to limit transmission of CWD among animals and reduce the potential for human exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01091-19
JournalmBio
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 23 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Osterholm et al.

Keywords

  • Chronic wasting disease
  • Infectious disease
  • Prion disease
  • Prions
  • Public health

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