Chromosomal abnormalities determined by comparative genomic hybridization are helpful in the diagnosis of atypical hepatocellular neoplasms

Sanjay Kakar, Xin Chen, Coral Ho, Lawrence J. Burgart, Oyedele Adeyi, Dhanpat Jain, Viabhav Sahai, Linda D. Ferrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: To explore the utility of cytogenetic abnormalities in the distinction of hepatic adenoma (HA) and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and results: Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to determine chromosomal abnormalities in 39 hepatocellular neoplasms: 12 HA, 15 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms (AHN) and 12 well-differentiated HCC. The designation of AHN was used in two situations: (i) adenoma-like neoplasms (n = 8) in male patients (any age) and women >50 years and <15 years old; (ii) adenoma-like neoplasms with focal atypical features (n = 7). CGH abnormalities were seen in none of the HAs (0/12), eight (53%) AHNs and 11 (92%) HCCs. The number and nature of abnormalities in AHN was similar to HCC with gains in 1q, 8q and 7q being the most common. Although follow-up information was limited, recurrence and/or metastasis were observed in three AHNs (two with abnormal, one with normal CGH). Conclusions: Adenoma-like neoplasms with focal atypical morphological features or unusual clinical settings such as male gender or women outside the 15-50 year age group can show chromosomal abnormalities similar to well-differentiated HCC. Even though these tumours morphologically mimic adenoma, they can recur and metastasize. Determination of chromosomal abnormalities can be useful in the diagnosis of AHN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-205
Number of pages9
JournalHistopathology
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

Keywords

  • CGH
  • Cytogenetic abnormalities
  • Hepatic adenoma
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma

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