Chlorophyll meter-based leaf nitrogen status to manage nitrogen in tropical potato production

Fabiana M. Fernandes, Rogério P. Soratto, Adalton M. Fernandes, Emerson F.C. Souza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a N intensive crop, and meeting its requirements with N fertilization is the primary practice to improve N recovery and achieve suitable tuber yield. A 3-site-year (SY) study was conducted to assess soil plant analysis development (SPAD)-502 chlorophyll meter efficacy for providing potato leaf real-time N status to adjust N timing and rate using nitrogen sufficiency index (NSI) thresholds of 90 or 95%. We evaluated effects of in-season SPAD-based N managements, as well as a reference with non-limiting N application, a fixed-timing (planting and hilling) conventional N fertilization, and a zero-N control on crop N uptake, tuber yield, and N-use efficiency of potato cultivar Agata grown in tropical clay soils. Tuber yields were similar in both SPAD-based managements. Under no intensive rainfall events after N applications, SPAD-based managements reduced N applications by 38–63% and resulted in comparable tuber set, bulking, and yield relative to conventional N fertilization. Additionally, SPAD-based management at a NSI threshold of 90% resulted in greater potato N-uptake efficiency and tuber yield per unit of N applied. SPAD-502 sensor was efficient for detecting plant N status when environmental conditions were more conducive for potato production and optimized N management by reducing application rates. However, with less favorable temperature and solar radiation for potato cultivation, and with intensive rainfall events following N application, SPAD readings did not guide to a proper N fertilization and resulted in reduced tuber yield. Therefore, under such conditions, a more accurate method for detecting plant N status should be used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1733-1746
Number of pages14
JournalAgronomy Journal
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) for providing a scholarship to the first author (finance code 001), the S?o Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) for partially supporting this research (grant no. 2016/15396-5), the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) for partially supporting this research and for granting awards for excellence in research to the second (grant no. 304736/2018-0) and third authors. We are thankful to the potato grower (Ivan Fornaziero), who provided the area for this investigation (SYs?2 and 3) and the Brazilian Association of Potato (ABBA) who provided the seed?tubers.

Funding Information:
We thank the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) for providing a scholarship to the first author (finance code 001), the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) for partially supporting this research (grant no. 2016/15396‐5), the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) for partially supporting this research and for granting awards for excellence in research to the second (grant no. 304736/2018‐0) and third authors. We are thankful to the potato grower (Ivan Fornaziero), who provided the area for this investigation (SYs 2 and 3) and the Brazilian Association of Potato (ABBA) who provided the seed tubers.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Agronomy Journal © 2021 American Society of Agronomy

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