Children with headache suspected of having a brain tumor: A cost-effectiveness analysis of diagnostic strategies

L. Santiago Medina, Karen M. Kuntz, Scott Pomeroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. To assess the clinical and economic consequences of 3 diagnostic strategies - magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography followed by MRI for positive results (CT-MRI), and no neuroimaging with close clinical follow-up - in the evaluation of children with headache suspected of having a brain tumor. Three risk groups based on clinical variables were evaluated. Materials and Methods. A decision-analytic Markov model and cost-effectiveness analysis was performed incorporating the risk group prior probability, MRI and CT sensitivity and specificity, tumor survival, progression rates, and cost per strategy. Outcomes were based on quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained and incremental cost per QALY gained. Results. For low-risk children with chronic nonmigraine headaches of >6 months' duration as the sole symptom (prior probability of brain tumor 0.01%), no neuroimaging with close clinical follow-up was less costly and more effective than the 2 neuroimaging strategies. For the intermediate-risk children with migraine headache and normal neurologic examination (prior probability of brain tumor 0.4%), CT-MRI was the most effective strategy but cost >$1 million per QALY gained compared with no neuroimaging. For high-risk children with headache of <6 months' duration and other clinical predictors of a brain tumor such as an abnormal neurologic examination (prior probability of brain tumor 4%), the most effective strategy was MRI, with cost-effectiveness ratio of $113 800 per QALY gained compared with no imaging. Conclusion. Our analysis suggests that MRI maximizes QALY gained at a reasonable cost-effectiveness ratio in children with headache at high risk of having a brain tumor. Conversely, the strategy of no imaging with close clinical follow-up is cost saving in low-risk children. Although the CT-MRI strategy maximizes QALY gained in the intermediate-risk patients, its additional cost per QALY gained is high. In children with headache, appropriate selection of patients and diagnostic strategy may maximize quality-adjusted life expectancy and decrease costs of medical workup.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-263
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume108
Issue number2 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 25 2001

Keywords

  • Children
  • Cost-effectiveness analysis
  • Headache

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