Children residing in low-income households like a variety of vegetables

Francine M. Overcash, Marla Reicks, Allison Ritter, Tashara M. Leak, Alison Swenson, Zata Vickers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Child vegetable intake falls far below the minimum recommended levels. Knowing which vegetables children may like help those responsible for providing vegetables to children to improve intake. The objective of this study was to measure vegetable liking for a wide variety of vegetables by a racially and ethnically diverse population of 9-12-year old children from low-income families. Children rated their liking of 35 vegetables using a 10-point hedonic scale. We tabulated the number of children that found each vegetable acceptable (ratings of 'okay' or above) and the number that found each vegetable unacceptable (ratings below 'okay'). More than 50% of children who had tried a vegetable considered it acceptable. A large majority of the vegetables had mean ratings in the acceptable range. Corn was the most liked vegetable, closely followed by potatoes, lettuce, and carrots. Artichoke had the lowest mean liking, followed by onion and beets. We found children liked a wide variety of vegetables which offers counter evidence to the commonly held perception that children do not like vegetables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116
JournalFoods
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Grant No. 2012-68001-19631 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Program Name: Childhood Obesity Prevention: Integrated Research, Education, and Extension to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Program Code: A2101. This work was also supported by the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station Project MN 18-081.

Funding Information:
Funding: This work was supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Grant No. 2012-68001-19631 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Program Name: Childhood Obesity Prevention: Integrated Research, Education, and Extension to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Program Code: A2101. This work was also supported by the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station Project MN 18-081.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Children
  • Liking
  • Low-income
  • Variety
  • Vegetables

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